A review of thucydides documentary the melian dialogue

Chapter 3 looks at Book 1 and gives a close analysis of the lead-up to the war, paying particular attention to the speeches of the Corinthians at Athens, of the Athenians at Sparta, and of Archidamus to his fellow Spartans.

I have not reproduced his italics, believing that in brief quotations they will only distract the reader. Thucydides characterizes the Athenians' thoughts about Sicily as based on irrational hope and ignorance, and, as in other parts of the work, the unreal is going to become real "because people are going to act out their hopes and desires" and the facts will be disregarded It has extensive supporting materials including running headers on every page to orientate the reader graphically and temporally, maps every few pages to indicate the places pertinent to that section, notes, appendices, and a glossary.

What is the melian dialogue??

It is a measure of his suc- cess that readers will judge such conflicts to have been rare. The point is not to defend or attack the attitudes represented on either side but to present them as historically significant discoveries, that is, in the final analysis, as constitutive elements of the general human way of existence" It was this latter predictive value to which Stahl particularly took exception.

With the war finally under way, "Thucydides forces the reader to compare plan with execution, to measure the perspectives of planning against those of the course of events" 80 ; there is an "increasing 'independence' of occurrences" as "the war takes on its own face by emerging gradually from behind the plans of the people involved and revealing itself as an independent entity" If some of his insights will seem familiar to readers, that is again the result of the influence the book has had over the years.

How does the Melian dialogue of Thucydides reflect

Connor, "A Post-Modern Thucydides? But even though it is so different from the Greek, is it not a valid enterprise, given that the sentiment originates from a speech designed to be especially rhetorically powerful, to aim to produce a translation in equally rhetorically effective English?

Here Stahl begins by examining two incidents in which commanders act outside of their original intention or orders. The most surprising omis- sion, here and in the notes, is Brian Bosworth's important article on the Melian dialogue: The book was enormously influential, and together with the work of W.

The Melian Dialogue

It is clearly the product of much labor and valuable thought. The Melians remind the Athenians that if the Athenians choose to follow this course and destroying the Melians, the Spartans out of honor would come to their aid and fight the Athenians.

Having been a free state for seven hundred years, they were not ready to give up that freedom. The Plataeans must lose, no matter whose side they take. Chapter 7 continues with the story to the end of the Archidamian War.

The Melians argued that by the law of nations they had the right to remain neutral, and no nation had the right to attack without provocation. Related to this is the assumption that speech and action are interdependent and must be examined together.

The Archaeology of Exploitation in Melos. Fortunately, the Athenians have sent representatives to the Melian council to give them the option of either being a tribute-paying state of Athens, or to be destroyed.

The Athenians counter that the Greek states on the mainland are unlikely to act this way. At the same time, the reasoned calculations of Archidamus are overcome by the passion of Sthenelaidas, a pattern that recurs throughout the history: Several kinds of action are spotlighted in this chapter.

To those familiar with the trends of the last thirty years of Thucydidean scholarship, this chapter will seem the most dated, but, again, that is thanks largely to the influence of Stahl and others. Thucydides' work must be viewed in its totality: In the end, the Melians decided to defend their nation-state against the Athenians Army and Navy.

Thucydides in this incident shows "misconception as a direct cause of action" 8 ,[[3]] and action once taken is no longer under rational control but has its own dynamic, the consequences of which cannot be foreseen by the historical actors.

Stahl focuses on what he calls the "hinge-points" of the narrative, those places where events begin to develop independently, i. You are not currently authenticated. HCT So much for errors.

Siege of Melos

He remarks n. This expedition was led by the generals Cleomedes and Tisias. Stahl focuses on a variety of scenes here, but the bulk of the chapter analyzes two narratives in detail: Yet, given the continued belief that human actions can be predicted and that the calculations of war can be easily assessed beforehand -- one can hardly help thinking of current events -- it is clear that the lessons imparted both by Thucydides and Stahl need to be learned again and again.trans.

Thucydides: The Peloponnesian War. With intro- duction and notes. Indianapolis and Cambridge: Hackett, xxii + pp. 4 maps. Cloth, $; paper, $ This translation is generally faithful and readable, with many excellent notes.

It is clearly the product of much labor and valuable thought. Documentary Essay Examples. 16 total results. The Major Social Problems Around the World.

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The Structure and Function of the Melian Dialogue. The Journal of Hellenic Studies, 88, p Thucydides, the peloponnesian war, the Melian Dialogue (Book 5, chapter 17) Athens pressured its allies and neutral cities and finally the Sparta were unhappy about the. The Melian Dialogue is an excerpt from Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War between the powerful Athenian Empire and the tiny island state of Melos.

The Athenians explain that power dynamics dominate the dialogue, whereas the Melians appeal to logic, reason and morality/5. The Melian Dialogue is an excerpt from Thucydides' History of the Peloponnesian War between the powerful Athenian Empire and the tiny island state of Melos.

The Athenians explain that power dynamics dominate the dialogue, whereas the Melians appeal to logic, reason and morality/5(17).

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A review of thucydides documentary the melian dialogue
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